Arterial Stiffness Linked to Incidence of Diabetes

Increased risk of diabetes across increasing tertiles of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity
 
Increased arterial stiffness, as measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV), is associated with increased incidence of diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Diabetes Care.
Iram Faqir Muhammad, from Lund University in Sweden, and colleagues examined the correlation between arterial stiffness as measured by c-f PWV and incidence of diabetes in a population of participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort.
 
Data were included for 2,450 individuals (mean age, 71.9±5.6 years).
The researchers found that 68 participants (2.8 percent) developed diabetes during a mean follow-up of 4.43±1.4 years. Subjects in the first, second, and third tertiles of c-f PWV had crude incidence of diabetes of 3.5, 5.7, and 9.5, respectively, per 1,000 person-years. The hazard ratio for diabetes was 1 (reference), 1.83, and 3.24, respectively, for the tertiles of c-f PWV after adjustment for potential confounders.
 
"Increased c-f PWV is associated with increased incidence of diabetes, independent of other risk factors. These results suggest that increased arterial stiffness is an early risk marker for developing diabetes," the authors write.
 
From www.healthdaynews.com
 
Iram Faqir Muhammad, Yan Borné, Gerd Östling, Cecilia Kennbäck, Mikael Gottsäter, Margaretha Persson, Peter M. Nilsson and Gunnar Engström
 
Abstract
OBJECTIVE Diabetes is known to be associated with increased arterial stiffness. However, the temporal association between increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV) and diabetes is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between arterial stiffness, as determined by c-f PWV, and incidence of diabetes.
 
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study population included participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cardiovascular cohort, using measurements from the 2007–2012 reexamination as baseline. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by measuring c-f PWV (SphygmoCor). After excluding participants with prevalent diabetes (according to measurements of fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance tests, and physician’s diagnoses), the final study population consisted of 2,450 individuals (mean age = 71.9 ± 5.6 years). Incidence of diabetes was followed by linkage to local and national diabetes registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the incidence of diabetes in relation to the tertiles of c-f PWV, adjusted for potential confounders.
 
RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 4.43 ± 1.40 years, 68 (2.8%) participants developed diabetes. Crude incidence of diabetes (per 1,000 person-years) was 3.5, 5.7, and 9.5, respectively, for subjects in the first, second, and third tertiles of c-f PWV. After adjusting for potential confounders, the hazard ratio of diabetes was 1.00 (reference), 1.83 (95% CI 0.88–3.8), and 3.24 (95% CI 1.51–6.97), respectively, for the tertiles of c-f PWV (P for trend = 0.002).
 
CONCLUSIONS Increased c-f PWV is associated with increased incidence of diabetes, independent of other risk factors. These results suggest that increased arterial stiffness is an early risk marker for developing diabetes.
 
Diab Care Oct 2017
 
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